Split For The Coast

Geek and optimist... sometimes. A whole lot of randomness is found on this blog

dingle-hopper:

DISNEY THEMED COCKTAILS!

My friend sent me this article and asked me to make him the Gaston next time he visits me at work! I figure I’m just going to make a princess theme night at the bar soon, maybe dress as the drink you want, or something like that lol. We had an Avengers night once, it was AWESOME! 

Gunna make me some Glass Slippers, Sirens Songs, and Rebel Royals….yummm

(via theeternallyitinerant)

archiemcphee:

Something awesome, surreal and possibly even a little bit magical is happening on a quiet street in the Toxteth district of Liverpool, England. Every night, when the clock strikes 10:00pm, the sliding storefront shutter on a derelict building opens to reveal a radiant blue tank of water filled with live, luminous jellyfish silently swimming around the space.

This dreamlike scene is a site-specific art installation created by artistic duo Walter Hugo & Zoniel for the Liverpool Biennial. Entitled The Physical Possibility of Inspiring Imagination in the Mind of Someone Living, the piece was not promoted in advance in any way. Instead it simply started happening and will continue making its punctual 10pm appearance until July 27, 2014.

If you can’t make it to Liverpool before the end of the month, you can click here to watch some video footage of the installation, which was shared by Neal Bryant.

[via designboom]

ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

(via batreaux)